GRE Blog

So, how is junior girls volleyball related to doing well on the GRE? I’ll let you decide. Several years ago, I took a teaching position at a private school in Victoria, Canada.  In addition to performing my regular teaching duties, I was...
In this article, we’ll examine some strategies for avoiding careless mistakes on the GRE. My primary focus will be on minimizing errors in the Quantitative section of the test, but some of the strategies can be applied to the Verbal...
- by Katharine Rudzitis Instead of setting up two equations for a word problem and solving for both variables, some questions can be answered using a ratio table. This is a great strategy when ratios appear in the question text. Take a...
Your GRE test will likely have some rates questions in the Quantitative Reasoning sections, so you must be prepared to find distance, rate, and/or time for each question. To do so, you’ll need the following three formulas: 1. Distance = (...
The fourth post in the GRE Quantitative Comparison series showed how to use estimation techniques to compare values quickly. We were able to solve the problem below: Column A                                            Column B (221)/(400...
Our fourth article in the GRE Quantitative Comparison series will show you another quick trick for comparing values in two columns. Let’s take a look at this problem: Column A                                       Column B (221)/(400...
In previous articles (Algebra vs Plugging in and Finding Equality, we showed several strategies for approaching GRE Quantitative Comparison problems. As a refresher, the two methods are solving using algebra, or solving by plugging in...
In an earlier post, we worked through a GRE practice problem using both an algebraic method and by plugging in values for x.  This post will focus on an additional strategy to use while plugging in numbers. To get started, let’s look at...
Consider the following Quantitative Comparison question:  Column A            Column B 16x + 4                  4x + 16 (A) Quantity A is greater. (B) Quantity B is greater. (C) The two quantities are equal. (D) The relationship cannot...
In my last post, we applied the Fundamental Counting Principle (FCP) to solve the following GRE-style question: How many different 3-digit numbers are greater than 299 and do not contain the digits 1, 6, or 8? (A) 180 (B) 245 (C) 291 (D)...

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